Saturday, July 26, 2008

Altars

A Catholic altar is primarily used for the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, where we believe a priest consecrates bread and wine into the substance of the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ. Catholic altars are traditionally made of stone, often marble, or wood. Before Vatican II, regardless of its material, a Catholic altar had to have an altar stone containing the relics of a Catholic martyr, thus making an altar a true altar. This altar stone is usually a flat square tablet, several inches by several inches with five crosses cut into it in an "X" pattern along its top surface; this stone is inset in the front top surface of the altar where the priest would reverence it during Holy Mass with several ceremonial kisses. The altar stone is usually difficult to spot as most altars are covered with linens during ceremonies and covers when not in use. If an altar stone is removed, the altar is desecrated and must be reconsecrated. Tabernacles, the little box-like compartments once found on most altars, were usually made of the same substance and style of the altar, though, according to Canon law, they had to be anchored to the altar so as not able to be moved. In the modern Church, tabernacles are rarely installed or have been allowed to remain on the altar and altar stones are all but discontinued save in traditional or pious channels.

In a nutshell, any flat surface can serve as an altar. A Greek corporal - a portable "altar stone" with relics sewn into it - can then be used by the priest. Mass can then be said on anything from a card table in a hotel to an ammunition crate in a war zone, as has been done by missionaries and military chaplains. In a case of emergency, Mass can be said without an altar stone almost anywhere, as the case of Cardinal Mindszenty who said Mass on his own chest while in prison. (sweet!)

6 comments:

Jason said...

What sort of relics are contained in an altar stone?

Fr. Brian Stanley said...

Relics for altar stones are from the martyrs of Rome: usually bits or pieces of bone. These are obtained by the [arch]diocese from a specific office in the Vatican, and come with an official certificate of authenticity, including the name[s] of the martyrs. In our altar, we have the relics of two saints, small pieces of bone, which have been sealed into a compartment in the altar stone.

Fr. Brian Stanley said...

BTW, the name of the saints whose relics we have in our altar are Sts. Laetus and Modestinus. I was just e-mailed by a friend who wondered.

HD said...

So does that mean that you don't need to have any sort of altar stone if one is not available? And do all priests, or all churches have "portable altar stones"? And is the portable altar stone similar to the stones that are placed in the altars at church? Is there a difference?

Catholic Teen- said...

I just posted a post on here to help answer your question. Thanks for commenting!

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